1Archaism

Archaism nedir? Archaism kullanımı ve örnekleri? İngilizcede kullanımdan düşmüş sözcük örnekleri. Modası geçmiş, kullanılmayan ingilizce sözcük ve deyimler.

Archaism nedir?

In language, an archaism is a word, a sense of a word, or a style of speech or writing that belongs to a historical epoch long beyond living memory, but that has survived in a few practical settings or affairs.

Lexical archaisms are single archaic words or expressions used regularly in an affair (e.g. religion or law) or freely; literary archaism is the survival of archaic language in a traditional literary text such as a nursery rhyme or the deliberate use of a style characteristic of an earlier age.

Archaisms are frequently misunderstood, leading to changes in usage. One example is found in the phrase “the odd man out”, which originally came from the phrase “to find the odd man out”, where the verb “to find out” has been split by its object “the odd man”, meaning the item which does not fit.

The compound adverbs and prepositions found in the writing of lawyers (e.g. heretofore, hereunto, thereof) are examples of archaisms as a form of jargon. Some phraseologies, especially in religious contexts, retain archaic elements that are not used in ordinary speech in any other context: “With this ring I thee wed.” Archaisms are also used in the dialogue of historical novels in order to evoke the flavour of the period. Some may count as inherently funny words and are used for humorous effect.

Examples

A type of archaism is the use of thou, the second-person singular pronoun that fell out of general use in the 17th century, while you or ye, formerly only used to address groups, and then also to respectfully address individuals, is now used to address both individuals and groups (but since this can result in ambiguity, y’all can be used to re-introduce the distinction). Thou is the nominative form; the oblique/objective form is thee (functioning as both accusative and dative), and the possessive is thy or thine.

Though thou hast ever so many counsellors, yet [“yet” is generally not an archaism, but it is in this context] do not forsake the counsel of thy own soul.

— English proverb

Today me, tomorrow thee.

— English proverb

The meaning of this proverb is that something that happens to a person, is likely to eventually happen to another who observes it, especially if the two people are similar.

To thine own self be true.

—William Shakespeare

Credit: Wikipedia

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